Richmond’s Bus Service, Dependable During the Day, Disappears After Dusk

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Richmond’s Bus Service, Dependable During the Day, Disappears After Dusk

Richmond’s Rose View Transit System, which provides bus service around the city, generally functions
well, according to area residents. If there is one issue, though, it is the limited service hours.
Rose View has 13 buses, six of which regularly circulate along the city’s bus routes. Another four provide
paratransit services, allowing elderly or disabled residents to schedule a pick-up or drop-off to and from
requested locations. The remaining three buses are held in reserve.
In 2017, Rose View carried over 216,000 riders, making it the 42 nd largest of the 56 transit systems in the
state, according to the National Transit Database (NTD).
The buses run every 30 to 60 minutes from 6:15 AM to 5:45 PM on weekdays and 9:15 AM to 4:45 PM
on Saturdays, covering six routes and more than 40 stops located at stores, churches, streets, senior living
facilities, municipal agencies, schools, and apartment complexes. There is no bus service on Sundays and
major holidays.
Some Richmond residents said that they wanted the buses to run later.
Deborah L. Burke, an administrative assistant at the Richmond Adult Education Center, said that the
limited service hours were an issue for students enrolled in the center’s classes that run from 5:00 PM to
8:00 PM. (The center purchases bus passes for its students so that they can get to class and back.)
Michelle Minor, a victim advocate at Genesis of Richmond, an organization that helps survivors of
domestic abuse and sexual assault, said someone needing a ride after the buses stop running might need to
ask a friend or take the Depot Taxi.
Depot Taxi costs $8 per person for a single trip to anywhere in the city. The federal minimum wage is
only $7.25 an hour, and as of 2017, Richmond’s poverty rate was 23.4%. (The Indiana and national
poverty rates were 13.5% and 12.3%, respectively, according to the United States Census Bureau).
Regular fare for Rose View is $1.75 for a single trip and $43.00 for a monthly pass. The agency also
offers discounted fares for students, seniors, and people with disabilities ($1.50 for a single trip and
$35.00 for a monthly pass, respectively).
Rose View also offers free transfers, so someone traveling from the Richmond Mall to Reid Hospital, for
example, only needs to pay one fare each way, but they would have to take three buses.
The bus route map—available as a PDF document on the city government’s website—lists the times that
the buses will arrive at the stops throughout the city. The buses are not equipped with GPS, however,
which means residents cannot track them.
Still, the agency says that on-time performance is not an issue. “The bus routes/times on the city’s website
are pretty accurate,” said Terri Quinter, Rose View Transit’s operations manager who has worked there
for 31 years. “The buses are always on time give or take a minute or two, unless heavy snow, ice or
accidents may hold the buses up.”

People with comments or suggestions regarding the bus service can call the mayor’s office or her direct
line, said Quinter.
Over all, residents agree that the city’s public transit system is working well.
John Burroughs, a staff member at the Hope House, an addiction recovery center in Richmond, said that
some of the organization’s residents take the buses regularly to participate in their drug rehabilitation
program in town, and that the buses arrive on time at the stop half a block from the Hope House.
“They do their best,” said Burroughs.

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